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Growing Good Food at Home

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The Everything Tomato Guide: All You Need to Know About Growing, Harvesting, Cooking, and Eating Delicious Tomatoes

Please check out the brief video above, to learn what this premium collection is all about—the video will give you a glimpse into all the content in this collection, including history and background, planting tips, specific plant profiles, recipes, nutrition and health information, and resources to help you be the best food gardener you can be.

Welcome to the really wonderful world of growing your own tomatoes! According to the National Gardening Association, 86% of American households grow tomatoes—vastly outpacing the next most-popular home-grown food item, cucumbers, at 47%. Tomatoes are so popular, and yet so easy to grow.…  READ MORE right arrow
Norann Oleson, Editorial Director of Food Gardening Network
Have you ever tried eating a whole, raw tomato like you would eat an apple? If you have, it’s best that you eat your own home-grown tomatoes and not those washed-out-looking, store-bought tomatoes. A fresh garden tomato—and not only the pop-‘em-in-your-mouth-size Cherry tomatoes—are simply succulent and…  READ MORE right arrow

Features

Tomatoes come in three main types: standard, hybrid, and heirloom. Standard tomatoes are exactly what the name implies—standard—they haven’t been cross-pollinated or altered and don’t have any heritage. Hybrid and heirloom tomato types are explained below: Hybrid tomatoes are…  READ MORE right arrow
Tomato plants are self-pollinating, because their flowers have both male and female parts. Most plants aren’t routinely exposed to natural cross-pollination, however, if a bee or other insect were to access some of the flower, cross-pollination could occur between two differing varieties of plants. Even the…  READ MORE right arrow
For descriptive growing purposes, tomatoes are grouped into two classifications—determinate and indeterminate. Determinate tomato plants are bushy and grow to about 3 to 5 feet and top off at that height. Determinate tomato plants tend to deliver their harvest all at…  READ MORE right arrow

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