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Growing Good Food at Home

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Marvelous Cauliflower: All You Need to Know about this Cruciferous Veggie, from Planting to Eating

Please check out the brief video above, to learn what this premium collection is all about—the video will give you a glimpse into all the content in this collection, including history and background, planting tips, specific plant profiles, recipes, nutrition and health information, and resources to help you be the best food gardener you can be.

Have you tried cauliflower pizza crust? It’s all the rage in restaurants and grocery stores, and for good reason. Cauliflower is a power food that’s super good for you and super tasty as well. It makes a great substitute for high-carb foods like…  READ MORE right arrow
Norann Oleson, Editorial Director of Food Gardening Network
Meet cabbage flower—or at least that’s what its name means. Cauliflower comes from the Latin caulis (cabbage) and floris (flower). As its technical name, Brassica oleracea var. Botrytis, suggests, it’s a vegetable in the Brassicaceae family that includes cabbage, plus broccoli, Brussels sprouts, collards, kale, and kohlrabi. As…  READ MORE right arrow
Cauliflower and florets

Features

Cauliflower head that has “buttoned”
Above all, growing cauliflower depends on temperature. If you live in a zone where you have two to three months of temperatures averaging in the 60s, specifically 65 to 68 degrees F during the day, you’re in prime growing territory. Everyone else has to work a…  READ MORE right arrow
Planting cauliflower seeds
You can choose to grow your cauliflower from seeds or seedlings, starting seeds indoors or outside directly in the garden. And when it comes to choosing seeds, be sure to gauge the length of time your climate stays in that desired 60s range of temperatures for the variety…  READ MORE right arrow
Planting cauliflower seedlings
To grow from seedlings, first prepare your soil as mentioned above. If you choose to buy nursery-grown seedlings, or you’re transplanting your own pot-grown seedlings, plant them two to four weeks before the last spring frost date for a spring crop. Plant in the cooler part of the…  READ MORE right arrow

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